Singing about the Home Health Aide

It’s been a quiet couple of weeks. We spend a lot of time sleeping or watching movies/TV on Netflix. We’re also eating poorly, since neither of us feels like making “real” food. My parents generously threw some money into our bank account, which we are using for some bills–and some eating out. Otherwise, we’d starve, I guess.

Last week I did something new. Well, it really is something old, but something I’ve not been doing for a while. A friend of mine pointed me to a website, “SingSnap.com”, which is essentially online karaoke–but you record your singing and share it with the community. He told me about it almost 7 or 8 years ago. At that time, I couldn’t get it to work right on my computer and I was busy doing other things, so I never really followed through on trying it out. (If you decide it would be fun, go there and look for “KnottyKitteh” to hear my recordings.)

I sang my first solo when I was 9 years old, singing “O Come All Ye Faithful”. I was actually singing long before that since my whole family is musical. I sang in high school, both in the usual “just sign up for the class” choir as well as the audition-only group. Once out of high school and on to the rest of my life, I sang all the time at home, and with a group when one was available. That mostly meant church choirs (since I had not ascended to Buddhism yet, lol). When I moved to Rochester NY, I started with the choir at the local Catholic church but due to personal pressures, withdrew from them. But I did get an unexpected benefit: I could walk into the church a little before the service and the organist and I would plan a solo for me to sing during Communion. I sang Schubert’s “Ave Maria” often; also did the Bach/Gounod “Ave Maria”, and Franck’s “Panis Angelicus”.  It was also at this time that I discovered the Rochester Oratorio.

The Oratorio performs in a variety of venues, including the Eastman School of Music’s auditorium when they perform with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. They also sing at the Hochstein, various churches, and in government buildings for Christmas time. When I was with them, we also sang at the Geneva Opera House, in Geneva NY which is considered to be a premier opera house.

I have to tell you that I went to my audition, I sang for the maestro (and the pianist, and a couple of other people) and then awaited his decision. I will never forget what he told me that day: “With a voice like yours, you should be singing.”

And I did, until asthma pretty much removed the ability to commit to that kind of singing. But I still sang at home, I sang with my children (who both have excellent voices!). I tried singing at the UU church we attended in Manassas VA and struggled with the effort it took. I finally had to stop and I explained to the director that the effort to sing and the fact that I was obviously not singing up to what had been my level of achievement combined with the figurative slap to the face that I couldn’t sing like I had made the choir into something that I dreaded, rather than enjoyed.

And then, a few years later, I ended up where I am now: disabled, in pain and without much to sing about. I have not sung consistently in over 8 years. I miss it. The few times I try to sing, I realize that I cannot hit the notes, cannot sustain them…it isn’t worth it. But! Then I remembered this site and I went over to take a peek. I signed up, and have discovered that while I may not have the voice I used to, I still have a voice that I can use to sing. So almost every day, I spend a couple of hours singing and recording. I’ve discovered that I am focused enough what I’m doing, concentrating on the words and timing, that I don’t notice my pain. It totally distracts me from the anxiety and depression I’ve got. I am now having “music therapy”, and I tell you, if you like to sing, try this out. It won’t hurt. It might even help.


Turning back to the fibromyalgia part of my life. I’ve complained (on here) about my inability to take care of my self and my house. Taking a shower exhausts me for two days; washing the dishes means that I won’t have the energy to cook anything. So Beloved and I have applied for In Home Health Services (IHHS) to get an in-home care provider. It will be someone who can come and clean, take out the trash, bring up the laundry and groceries. (Side note: Beloved has fallen *hard* down the stairs [stepping off the 2nd step, thinking he’s on ground level. Oops] three times in the past 8 weeks. He’s become phobic, and who can blame him, about carrying things down, since that’s when it occurs.)

This care provider will also give me a shower and wash my hair–and truthfully, I have no nudity taboo, so that’s not a problem for me. This person will give Beloved foot care, which he needs because of the problem he has with the heels splitting. With our charming, 31 inch square, coffin — AHEM– I mean, shower stall, he cannot bend over to clean adequately from the knees down.

I feel stupid, having to have someone else do the things that I should be doing, that I have been doing all my life. I am grateful beyond words that I can have someone come and do it…but…so I’m doing a little bipolar dance about the topic.

We have applied and had the home inspection to determine if we are eligible, and how much we are eligible for. So the IHHS person came today to give us our orientation for getting a home health aide. They have approved about 22-ish hours per month, for each of us, so it’s about 45 hours per month or about 11 hours per week, which is totally awesome. It’s up to us to find and hire a care provider (or in our case, possibly two, more on that in a moment), then train them to do what we want. We will track and submit their actual time for the county to cut a paycheck.

We had already discussed that Beloved has a person in his group therapy who will clean houses. She is, in fact, the young lady who came several months ago to clean our bathroom and kitchen. I don’t remember if I told you. Anyway, we would like to offer her the chance to have a steady and set income. It would be at an hourly rate less than we paid her, but if she’s willing, I would be very relieved. I know that she will clean to my (my mother’s, if we’re going to tell the truth) standards. So then we would hire a second person to come do the personal care for Him and me.

I am hoping that having the basic tasks done, including my personal care, will allow me the energy and fortitude to do other, perhaps more enjoyable, things. I won’t have expended my small store of spoons (Spoon Story) and that would be an amazing, amazing thing. That possibility is what keeps me from trying to argue with someone that I don’t “really” need help, that I can do it (if I just stretch a day’s worth of chores across a week). And that is something worth being thankful for–and I am!


So there we are, caught up on events. Appointments this week include trips to the headshrinkers for both of us, then Beloved’s usual Friday funfest of group therapy followed by game group therapy.

My physical therapy was re-approved, so I’ve got a few days to do pool therapy; Beloved is also scheduled for his sessions through the middle of May. (My last swim session is on the same day — and time — as his re-evaluation, at which time he will request more physical therapy. Stupid arrangement…you get about a week’s worth of visits, with two evaluations (before and after) and then you get to wait some indeterminate amount of time while insurance decides if it will pay for more. And while you’re waiting? Any forward progress you might have made waves “bye-bye”. I can’t think of ANY injury or health issue that requires physical therapy that only needs 5-7 visits to be “healed”.)

Nothing major on the horizon, except of course for the decision about my LTD insurance benefits…fingers still crossed and noting that 2 weeks of what we hope is only 8 weeks has gone past.

Namaste!

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Road Trip to Redding: The Return Home

Welcome back, gentle reader.

The wheelchair-able vehicle showed up at 12 noon, on Tuesday the 31st. We loaded up and headed East. I swear to the gods that POS had no shocks and certainly had NO padding on the seats. I tried all three seats in the back (since Beloved got the shotgun seat) and I couldn’t say that this was too soft, this was too hard, this was just right. They were all too hard and nothing was just right.

Have I mentioned that Redding is East of Eureka, through the mountains? It is, and with all that “going through the mountains” holds. The driver was obviously not real familiar with the road and seemed surprised at the “30 mph, 270 degree” turns. The various zig-zags also apparently startled him. How was the ride? Well, it was just like riding a not-too-well trained horse…I had to lean left and lean right and brace myself for almost every turn.

But wait! There’s MORE! And it only gets better! Highway 299 is undergoing a long term construction project to widen the road and make it safer where they have rock falls of a somewhat frequent nature. I knew this from examining Google Maps. This was also a shock to the driver (and to the company –“Access on Time” — who hired him) since neither of them thought about leaving a bit early to make up for time spent sitting on the road, waiting for the one lane road to be in our favor.

If you have to stop for 5 – 10 minutes before being able to continue upon your trek, no big deal, right? What if you have to do that 5-7 times? That adds up. What had been advertised as a 3 hour tour ended up being 4 hours of hell. And since my appointment with the doctor had an arrival time of 3:15 to complete paperwork and prepare for the actual examination at 4:00 … that meant that I entered the office at 4:15. Oops. Thankfully the only comments made pursuant to my lateness was concern that something had happened to us. (Even the driver’s company had called, looking for him.) But enough of that bad memory.

The doctor’s staff was kind and efficient. I had my blood pressure taken (a bit high, but who could blame me with a pain level of about 8 and the anxiety of the visit itself?), temperature measured and I got weighed. Oh happiness–somewhere in the 2 months since my last visit to the VA clinic, I lost 10 pounds. I can only hope it doesn’t pull a Lassie on me and travel from the clinic back to me!

I got put into the exam room and waited for the doctor–a penance happily accepted as my due for being late enough that almost anywhere else I’d have been told to reschedule. He came in and we began the evaluation. He hit me with a hammer, which felt like being hit with a hammer even though it was just the reflex tester. We talked about when my pain started (in 1975, as I so facetiously put on the form I gave them) and how it manifests. We talked about what I can–and cannot do. He poked and prodded, had me demonstrate a knowledge of where my body parts, in this case hands, were in space without being able to see them.

He also inquired quite closely about my employment and how long it had been since I had worked. We finally worked our way back to the starting point for his questions: he said, and I quote, “So the company is trying to not have to pay you something?”. And I replied, “Oh yes. It’s the long term disability insurance company trying not to pay me disability pay” … which was what I thought the premiums paid to that company were for. Silly me. He really did take an hour to make his evaluation–and had apparently really gone through the paperwork I had brought–a 2 inch tall stack of paper, not terribly impressive but still a lot to have leafed through. Makes me wonder if he has photographic memory.

He thanked me and I was turned loose–but I do have to say, that comment about the company not wanting to pay out something…gives me some hope that he will tell them there is no doubt about my being disabled. He had touched about 8 of the trigger points which I had jerked back and then begged not to be touched…says he, “Oh you definitely have multiple triggers–and you cannot fake triggers.” So I am not faking being disabled…really? This is what I’ve been trying to tell the LTD insurance company for almost 3 years.

It was a real relief to come out of his office. Regardless of his evaluation, whatever he tells the company…my part in this hellacious process is done. I have done all that I can, produced all the doctor’s notes and lab reports to back up my assertion that I am, indeed and so help me all the gods, disabled. The decision, good or bad (and of course, I am hoping for good!), is now out of my hands–and this will be the absolute ultimate decision. No appeals, no repeals, no other line of inquiry to follow up. So there is a definite loss of anxiety about this. There’s still some for the decision itself–but of course!–but I cannot do anything more to convince this company of my real physical condition. To say nothing of the mental condition…

So I come out of the doctor’s office to find our transportation is on site (I didn’t need to call and request it) and we get into another wheelchair-ready vehicle…and the seats are padded! Too bad it was only about a 15 minute drive to the hotel, but there we are. We stayed at the Win-River Casino and Hotel, because apparently it had the cheapest rooms in town. I am okay by that, since the hotel portion was only completed in 2014–so it’s not as old as our tenure here.

It’s (obviously) run by one of the tribes of The People; lots of Native art and colors used in the decorating. We were greeted by a porter, who was all smiles and helpfulness. Check-in was a breeze, and then up to the room. Nice room, lots of small amenities one does not expect to find in a “cheap” hotel. We had to walk through the casino to get to their “Elements” restaurant. I’d have to wear my earplugs to be able to play the games–too much noise, too many lights, too many people in one space. The one thing there wasn’t? Smoking. The WHOLE place is NO smoking allowed. So there went my chance to go back to the room smelling like an ashtray.

The restaurant was separated by a well-designed and attractive half-wall (well, almost 3/4, but you know what I mean), so the noise and lights were really just a faint background intrusion. I could hear the “Jackpot!” buzzers when they went off…but otherwise, I could just block it all out by not looking out beyond that attractive wall. We had looked at the menu online and Beloved’s parents had spotted us money for food (the one thing we paid for on this medical journey), so we tried several things. He had their buffalo chili, declared it good; we got the smoked trout spread appetizer which was nice. I had a cup of the enchilada soup, also very good. For dinner he got a buffalo burger, topped with pastrami and horseradish cheddar cheese. I got fish’n’chips. I had a glass of the house Chardonnay with dinner which was so good, I took a glass to go when we headed back up to our room.

(BTW, my friend is a real oenophile and I wish he had been there because we could have gotten a bottle of La Crema for almost $20 less than he paid in NoVA. The liquor prices are lower because The Peoples do not pay all those nasty taxes!)

We lounged for a little while, I drank my glass of “to go” wine and then we fell into bed. The only really bad part about the hotel was their beds…ack. Neither of us slept very well and my bed had a decided squeak, loud enough to stir me from sleep every time I moved. Sigh. I guess that’s what you get for a night’s free stay!

Up in the morning, Beloved took advantage of a shower that is larger than our 31″ phone booth shower stall. I began gathering stuff up and it was a good thing we were as far in our preparations to leave as we were. At 10 am, the front desk called with our transportation back to Eureka; the itinerary I had said pick-up time would be 11 am. Oh dear. Better quality wheelchair van; same company as the good ride from the doctor’s office–and they are considering expanding into Eureka, which I would love. Older driver, who makes that particular run about 5 or 6 times per month, so he was very familiar with the road and managed to “straighten out” some of the worst curves. The ride was very different going home…

I have to tell you about this driver: old, white male. Obviously gets his news and other personal stances on topics from Fox. We tread dangerously onto thin ice with discussion about the ACA, “Easterners don’t like guns” and the such like. Since we were trapped in this hurtling vehicle, which he controlled…we just politely agreed and then changed the subject. He did have a lot of incidental information about the route itself, which was cool. He could name the various rivers and mountain ranges we were going past. Beloved got to see some of the really tall Rockies, complete with snow on top! You just can’t get a good perspective on the mountains without actually being in them and realizing that what you thought was about 100 feet is more like a 1000.

The one unabashed compliment I’d have to pay this driver was this: he had the most incredible, best use of side hair, comb-over I have ever, ever seen! The hair strands were about 6-8 inches long and most artfully trained up over the bald pate in curls and swirls and hairsprayed into an inch of their lives, giving an incredible illusion of a full head of hair. The only reason I got to looking closely was his repeated fluffing and checking the location of the illusion he was perpetrating.

The one thing I’d use to describe his overall personality would be this: he told us that he and his wife had bought a car–a Corvette. He had a picture of it on his phone, which he showed us. He proudly told us that he had put on an additional $17,000 in frou-frou additions, like a special paint job, “wings” instead of steering wheel, and he showed off the electronic key–which has a “real” key hidden within to get into the trunk. As Beloved pointed out  to me later, that type of key makes him extremely attractive to hackers who would like to take a Corvette for a spin. I felt vaguely unhappy with this confession of car buying until I realized that it was not just buying a car. It was buying a $40,000 car, adding $17,000 of bullshit accessories–so a vehicle that was worth almost $60,000. That only seats TWO people. That has naught of any storage type space, so it can’t carry cargo, not even an overnight case. And since he admitted that when he drives the wheelchair van, he stays in the fast lane and does 5 mph over the limit…I can only imagine how fast he takes that ostentatious consumerist vehicle when he’s driving it. If he can afford that kind of car, he probably can afford the speeding tickets.

And I am deeply offended by that kind of wasted spending–and the selfish desires behind it. Not just the money to pay for the car, and the money for accessories. It’s specifically designed to use fossil fuels; it emits pollution, it’s made of plastic and polymers, which is another use of fossil fuels. And the sheer amount of money it actually cost him? Could have been used for something much more generous, much more usable…donation to the local homeless shelter, a grant to the local primary school, given to the library to buy more books, upgrade their computers…the list is only limited by your imagination. I realize that it’s his money, he can buy whatever he wants…but I try to follow the concepts of Buddhism, which includes generosity without thought of recompense, giving to those who need when you have the means to do so. I consider that big of a compensation for small penis size…self-centered and completely unable to see the needs of people who are not part of “his” people, not part of Us, they are “Them” and as such, don’t need and worse, don’t deserve any relief from their troubles.

(Author’s note: the reference to small penis size is not meant to denigrate or in any way make fun of those who are not hung like a horse. The average vagina is 3-4 inches deep; the average penis is 5-6 inches. Plenty of happy action there. It’s trying to compensate with external and meaningless gestures, like buying the type of vehicle that is supposed to scream “Look at me, I am SOOOOOO manly”…which makes most woman automatically subtract 4 inches from estimated penis size…then balance that against what must be his bank account’s size. Fellas, take what Nature (or God, if you want to involve him in this discussion) gave you and learn how to actually use it–or how to compensate with other (oral or digital — meaning fingers, not electronics, you dirty minded perv) forms of pleasure for your partner.

Nobody NEEDS a Corvette. Trust me, I think they are some pretty awesome speed beasts. But my son pointed out the basic truth about ‘Vettes when he was high school: “Mom, how’s come only old guys own Corvettes?” Now talk to me about a 68-69 Chevelle and you will see me trying not to salivate. Love me some muscle cars…LOL.

Back to the trip: We got home about 2:30ish, making the actual travel time from our house to Redding at 4 hours, not 3. Got in the house, did some mild unpacking and then fell into bed for a good long nap. We are both exhibiting the physical signs of stress and anxiety relieved. My mental state is actually a bit clearer feeling than it has in a while–but I am at the verge of weeping. I’m finding my hand tremors are terrible–worse than ever. Beloved suggests I might be actually overdosing on the Gabapentin, so that is something I will follow up with my doctor whenever I actually get to see whomever is going to be my primary care physician. I have a list of things I want to talk about–some of it VA-specific, some of it just about me.

So now we settle back into our usual routine. Beloved has pool therapy set up for about twice a week through the end of April. I am waiting to find out if the VA will re-approve me for my therapy. Just getting into the nice warm pool and bobbing about without gravity on my back is wonderful. I’ll do that for 6 or 8 months and then we can talk about adding some small stretching or exercises. Maybe.

I made an appointment with my psychologist, who I haven’t seen since before Beloved’s hospital stay and his parents’ visit. Lots to report to the headshrinker! And Beloved’s birthday is in 23 days…and this is a “freak-out” milestone: he turns 40. BFD says I, from my vantage point of 53, going to be 54 years old in August. Guess I’d better find him some denture cream and a walker…LMAO.

So that’s what happened, and that’s my story–and I’m sticking to it. I ask you all to have lots of good thoughts and positive energy that the doctor in Redding will make a positive (for me) evaluation and I will start to get my LTD benefits again. (And that would make me really happy, as they owe me a butt-ton of back pay. We could sure a butt-ton of money!)

So peace out, talk to you all soon.